Posts in Content

TV and search: associative marketing in a two-screen world

Everyone is aware of product placement, the deliberate incorporation of a product or brand into a movie, television episode or other media vehicle to promote it to the viewing audience, typically in a subtle way to create affinity and recognition over time.

However, there’s more to product placement than simply placing a Papa John’s pizza box in clear view in a major sitcom.

From a marketer’s perspective that is only one facet of how what appears on TV can impact on what consumers then think about and do, and it isn’t limited to just brand placement, recognition and recall either.

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Google tries to keep SERPS from going stale with Freshness update

Google may be the world's most widely-used search engine, but that doesn't mean that it's perfect. Indeed, the past several years have seen a growing number of complaints from users and experts alike relating to the quality of Google search results.

More recently, it appears that Google has focused much of its efforts to improve on weeding out spam and the low-quality content made famous by content farms.

But a new update that the company revealed yesterday shows that Google isn't just focusing on minimizing the amount and prominence of cruddy content in its index.

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Localization: the next big to-do for mobile app developers?

When the web was young, most websites were in English. This wasn't exactly surprising. After all, the web first emerged in the United States in a big way and was its largest initial market.

Over time, of course, the web has come to bring the world closer together and in turn, give companies anywhere in the world opportunities global in size.

For many companies, that meant moving beyond the English language to reach customers and stakeholders in their native tongues.

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Will book publishers follow in the footsteps of the RIAA?

In its effort to defend the record labels, musicians and the recording industry at large, the RIAA became perhaps one of the most disliked organizations in the world.

Yes, most people will agree that piracy is wrong and that laws protecting content creators and rights holders are sensible, but the RIAA's tactics in fighting piracy, which infamously included widely-publicized lawsuits against grandmothers (dead or alive), didn't win it many fans.

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Google starts indexing Facebook, third-party comments

A relatively large number of publishers, particularly those running 'blogs', rely on third-party services to power the comments on their websites.

From Facebook Comments to Disqus, there is no shortage of options that enable publishers to offer commenting functionality without having to implement it themselves.

While not the most technically complex functionality to implement, there are a number of reasons publishers might choose to outsource comments, ranging from spam control to identity management.

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Landmark EU ruling moves the boundaries for publishers

Last week we saw Mirror Group Newspapers (MGN) lose its appeal to overturn a privacy action in the French courts by actor Olivier Martinez.

Martinez successfully sued the publishers of the Sunday Mirror in 2008 over an article that was published online about the actor’s then relationship with Kylie Minogue, saying that it negatively affected his reputation in France.

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How to optimise headlines using the 65 character rule

I’m currently developing some wireframes as we pave the way for a revamp of this blog later this year. There are lots of things to think about. One of those things is typography. Closely related to that is optimal headline length. 

I always try to write headlines that fit on one line, though I don’t always succeed. Nevertheless, short headlines beat longer ones for lots of reasons. As such I’d like to introduce the 65 character rule. Actually it’s 65 or less, to be precise. 

Here’s why...

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Apple isn't worried about the Kindle Fire, but should it be?

Apple may have disappointed Wall Street with its fourth quarter earnings, but make no mistake about it: most companies would kill for a quarter like it.

The company issued a strong guidance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2012, and Apple's CEO Tim Cook is confident.

Case in point: when it comes to the nascent tablet market, Cook isn't at all worried about possible competition from new devices like Amazon's Kindle Fire.

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Five tricks our minds play on us and what marketers need to know

There’s a phenomena on the cusp between behavioral economics and psychology known as cognitive biases which are essentially scientifically documented tricks that our minds play on us.

As all of us in the world of digital marketing are in the business of persuasion, understanding these often irrational tendencies can help us do a better job.

Some are glaringly oblivious when you’re alerted to them, other are far more subtle in the way they influence decision making. 

I recently delivered a talk at A4U Expo London exploring a few of these ‘mind tricks’ but I want to explain them further and in more depth.

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Managing expectations in B2B content marketing

Your audience's opinions abut your content depends largely on their expectations, but few B2B marketers think about managing expectations around their content marketing.

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Seven steps to sublime (or at least successful) subject lines

In a world increasingly driven by content that's hiding in an email or behind a Tweet, subject lines are more important than ever.

In advance of a talk later this week at the Internet Marketing Conference in New York, here are some of the approaches and best practices in crafting better subject lines.

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Thanks to Panda, content farms start harvesting less content

Love them or hate them, content farms are a reality on today's web. Thanks to the strength of the search economy, savvy upstart publishers realized that there was money to be made mass-producing search engine-friendly content on the cheap.

But content farming's success may have been its downfall. As the SERPs filled up with articles of dubious value, search engines have fought back. Some went so far as to ban well-known content farms from their indexes.

Banning large, prominent sites is, for obvious reasons, a challenging proposition for Google. But it too has fought back hard against content farms using ts algorithm.

While the verdict is out as to whether it's changes are improving search quality on the world's largest search engine, it appears that some content farmers are adjusting their businesses.

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