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Posts tagged with Eu

ICO follows ICO's rules, cookie usage drops by 90%

Although businesses have an extra year to chew on it, barring a miracle, they'll eventually have to figure out what the updates to Regulation 6 of the UK's Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003 mean and how to make sure they're adhered to.

Those updates, of course, require that users provide "consent" for the placement of a cookie on their machines.

6 comments

Something to chew on: the ICO's vague cookie advice

If the Information Commissioner's Office has its way, cookies will soon be a lot less tasty to website operators.

That's because on May 26, the rules governing the use of cookies on websites in Regulation 6 of the UK's Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003 will be updated in to require that a user "has given his or her consent" to the placement of a cookie in accordance with a new European Directive.

6 comments

ECJ: AdWords buy is trademark infringement

In 2009, the British High Court was asked to weigh in on the long-standing dispute between Interflora and Marks and Spencer, which centered on Marks and Spencer's bidding on 'Interflora' as a Google AdWords keyword. It referred the matter to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

The Advocate General ECJ has finally answered: Marks and Spencer violated Interflora's trademark.

19 comments

ACTA one step closer to reality with EU Parliament approval

Last November, I suggested that ACTA, the not-so-secret-anymore Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement that governments have been negotiating for more than a year, could be "the worst thing for the internet - ever."

And with a 331-294 approval in the EU Parliament, it's one step closer to reality.

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Are cookies off the menu in the new online Europe?

There has been a lot of noise recently surrounding the new legislation on online tracking and the use of cookies and permission. Marketers must sit up and listen to the potential underlying threat this legislation can pose and consider whether a new approach to transparency and education can head off the threat now and in the future. 

It seems most of the controversy is based on the typical ambiguity that seems to exist in many online rules and regulations. Because, let’s face it, the situation is meant to be led by public opinion, with the legislators supposedly following suit. The public want to be “protected” from evil online marketing spies, who are poised and ready to sell something at the first sign of interest.

Or do they?

12 comments

Cookies under fire as regulators move in

A massive push on securing opt-ins from consumers on cookies is well under way both here and in the US.

For the record, and contrary to what you might think, I’m glad, if only because it forces us to review how we failed so badly to keep the wider world informed about how online advertising works.

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Will MySQL falter under Oracle's ownership?

Oracle's pending acquisition of Sun Microsystems apparently has some users of MySQL worried. MySQL, of course, is the open source database owned by Sun and offered freely under a GNU General Public License.

It's the most popular open source RDBMS in the world, and is used with popular products like WordPress and on major websites like Facebook and Wikipedia.

1 comment

More foolishness: German government officials claim Google Analytics is illegal

Are government bureaucrats in Europe trying to kill the commercial internet? If you've been following all of the laws, directives and general bureaucratic gobbledygook lately, you just might start to think the answer is 'yes'.

And now comes a new gem: some government officials in Germany apparently believe that Google Analytics is illegal. That's right, the free analytics service provided by Google is a threat to the citizens of Germany and they must be protected!

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EU: no cookies without consent. Will EU affiliate programs be killed?

Earlier this year, I wrote about an EU plan to require that internet users consent to cookies before they're placed on their computers. At the time, I called the plan "absurd".

Which must be precisely why the Council of the EU has approved a directive amending legislation to do just that. The announcement of this potentially horrendous action? Well-hidden in an 18 page Council press release.

31 comments

Microsoft to European Commission: we'll let consumers pick a browser

To appease the European Commission in its pending antitrust case over the tying of Internet Explorer and Windows, Microsoft initially planned to release a version of Windows 7 in Europe that would be browser-free. That would ensure that consumers had the ability to choose a browser freely.

But a couple of weeks ago, Microsoft reversed course and proposed an alternative solution: a "ballot screen" that would enable consumers in the EU to select their browser of choice.

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US to poker services: we weren't bluffing

Online gambling is a hot-button topic in the United States. When it comes to poker, which many argue is a game of skill, the US government considers the game to be illegal.

The US government has been successful in pushing some of the online poker services out of the American market. For instance, it drove out PartyGaming and Playtech, both of which are publicly-traded in the UK, and collected a hefty fine from PartyGaming.

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Use a proxy, go to jail?

Web proxy servers are not new. These servers, which serve as 'middlemen' for accessing the web, are often used by corporations to accelerate web browsing through caching and to filter traffic. They're also used by individuals looking for a bit of anonymity online.

I often use one since I live in a country that is sometimes blocked from using popular services that are based in the US.

3 comments