Posts tagged with Steve Jobs

Does the iAd Producer reflect a shift for iAds?

When you combine the world's most popular mobile and tablet computing devices with an advertising model that Steve Jobs himself was said to have called "revolutionary", you might expect overnight success.

But that hasn't exactly been the case for Apple and its iAd offering. Although it is far from a failure, it hasn't exactly upended the mobile advertising space -- yet at least.

4 comments

Will the Boxee Box meet the same fate as Google TV?

The battle to bring the internet to the small screen is heating up. And the fight to control when and how the internet is brought to the small screen is heating up too.

After finding Google TV blocked by a number of television networks, a Google product manager for Google TV recently stated that the company hasn't done a good enough job communicating what the product is to content owners. And it doesn't seem to be improving in that effort.

7 comments

Is Apple driving iAds advertisers away?

For advertisers looking for the holy grail in mobile, the iPhone is one of the most attractive targets. And with iAd, Apple is aiming for nothing less than the perfect mobile ad.

But sometimes perfect is the enemy of good, and if rumors that have been circulating are to be believed, Apple's quest for the perfect mobile ad is driving advertisers crazy. It's also driving them away from the advertising solution that's supposed to help them.

3 comments

Apple tries to throw competitors under the bus, but they won't go quietly

Apple's press conference last Friday was a notable event for the company. Not simply because Steve Jobs took the stage, but because the purpose of the press conference was to address problems being reported with an existing product, the iPhone 4.

It was unfamiliar territory for Apple and Steve Jobs. Jobs, of course, is used to introducing new products, not dealing with an existing one that is the subject of customer complaints, class action lawsuits and a media firestorm.

0 comments

Wanted: non-developers to develop Android apps

When Apple made it clear that apps created with Adobe's Flash Packager for iPhone would not be permitted in the App Store, Steve Jobs had an explanation: "We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform."

Many, myself included, found Jobs' explanation to be somewhat disingenuous. Tools that facilitate cross-platform development aren't necessarily responsible for bad code and poor software; bad development practices and poorly-skilled developers almost always are.

0 comments

Apple, consumers, the Reality Distortion Field and the iPhone 4

Imagine: you're getting crummy reception on your brand new smart phone when you hold it a particular way. You fire off an email to the CEO of the manufacturer. To your surprise, you get a response back: "Just avoid holding it in that way."

Soon, you learn that you're not the only one having problems. But you also discover that the company, rather than admit to a problem, has allegedly instructed its customer service representatives to use "positioning statements" to ensure consumers that everything is fine.

2 comments

Is Windows dead? Hardly

Earlier this week, Apple made an announcement that produced many headlines: in the 80 days following the debut of the iPad, the company has sold 3m tablets. For those of us who wondered if the iPad would sell, the answer is clearly a resounding "Yes!"

Not surprisingly, Apple's early success with the iPad has given a new form of ammunition to those who believe that the PC's best days are behind it. Even Steve Jobs stated earlier this month, "PCs are going to be like trucks. They’re still going to be around, they’re still going to have a lot of value, but they’re going to be used by one out of X people."

1 comment

Is Flash a fit for mobiles? We'll soon find out

In April, Apple CEO Steve Jobs explained in detail why consumers aren't going to see Flash support on the iPhone and iPad. Long story short: Adobe Flash "is no longer necessary." Although Apple's lack of support for Flash is often cited as an iPhone/iPad drawback, Flash certainly isn't going to win a whole lot of popularity contests either. But the question remains: is there a place for Flash in the mobile market?

We may soon have an answer.

3 comments

Adobe acts on its HTML5 ambitions

Shut out of the iPhone/iPad ecosystem by Apple, Adobe declared that it would "try and make the best tools in the world for HTML5." Less than two weeks after that statement was made, Adobe appears to be attempting to follow through.

At the Google I/O conference, the company demonstrated its HTML5/CSS3 update pack for Dreamweaver CS5, the latest version of the Adobe Creative Suite's web development application.

5 comments

Steve Jobs will kill the goose that laid the golden egg

The iPhone OS 4 SDK was released last week, but it's not all good news for iPhone (and iPad) developers. That's because Section 3.3.1 of the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement comes with a new catch:

Applications may only use Documented APIs in the manner prescribed by Apple and must not use or call any private APIs.

5 comments

Steve Jobs says iAds will do something novel — make mobile ads work

Today Steve Jobs announced what Apple has been working on since its reported $275 million acquisition of Quattro wireless in January — a mobile ad network. The new network, called iAd, promises to give advertisers what they've long been wanting from digital advertising — rich media experiences that engage consumers.

And thanks to Apple's proprietary hold on iPhone apps, it may just deliver. 

2 comments

Another hit for Adobe: Wikipedia video won't use Flash

Myriad are the complaints from developers and consumers who have had to deal with wonky Flash programming. But Apple has drawn a line in the sand with its refusal to support Flash on its mobile products, and the repurcussions are continue to be felt.

Flash currently flourishes online, but more and more companies are opting out of using it. First a few publishers came out with iPad friendly websites. And now the Open Video Alliance, which includes Mozilla, Kaltura, and Yale Law School, has announced plans to get video on Wikipedia – Flash-free.

3 comments