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Posts tagged with Sopa

Music industry agrees to new mechanical royalty rates deal

There is little doubt that digital is the future of music. The CD may not be dead, but it might as well be.

Its replacement for millions of consumers has been digital music services of various kinds, ranging iTunes and the Amazon MP3 Store to Pandora and Spotify.


Do Not Track gains support, but will it really work?

Today, the administration of US President Barack Obama announced a blueprint for a "Privacy Bill of Rights."

The goal: "improve consumers’ privacy protections" and "give users more control over how their personal information is used on the Internet", all the while maintaining the internet's status as an "engine for innovation and economic growth."

To achieve that goal, the president has enlisted the help of some of the internet's biggest names, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL.


In the wake of MegaUpload, another file sharing service bites the dust

When agents of the United States federal government began an international operation to raid MegaUpload, they were targeting after an organization that was allegedly engaged in a highly-illegal and highly-profitable piracy business.

But their actions have had a ripple effect across the internet, with other 'file locker' and 'file sharing' services questioning their own futures.


Angry Birds maker doesn't sweat piracy

While Hollywood pushes to have Washington D.C. take over the internet in the name of fighting piracy, some of the most successful purveyors of digital content are heading in the opposite direction.

Take for instance Rovio, the maker of Angry Birds.

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SOPA debate looks set to rage despite blackout protests

On Wednesday several major websites, including Wikipedia and Reddit, took their services offline in protest at the proposed SOPA bill.

For Wikipedia, the self-imposed blackout actually had the affect of increasing traffic as people logged on to see what the fuss was about.

In a nutshell, SOPA is an attempt to crackdown on internet piracy by shutting down sites that host copyrighted material.

Opponents say that it goes too far, as sites that link to other sites that host pirated material can also be shutdown, and threatens free speech.


SOPA blackouts to go on, even if bill is dead (for now)

Parts of the internet will go black tomorrow. From Wikipedia and Reddit to the Cheezburger network and Major League Gaming, numerous highly-trafficked web properties say they'll shut down to protest the SOPA legislation that would make the internet far less free in the name of fighting piracy.

Even Google is going to be making a statement using its homepage.

The blackouts are going on despite the fact that SOPA is effectively dead -- for the time being.


SOPA: the sad but honest truth

The fight against SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act, may be one of the most important fights ever waged on the internet. It threatens to change the course of the web's development, and not for the better.

Given the impact this dark and misguided legislation would have on the internet economy, it's no surprise that many are coming together to do what they can to ensure it doesn't become law.

The media is starting to pay attention, and SOPA supporters like GoDaddy are seeing that such support comes at a cost. These things provide some hope that SOPA will be defeated.

Unfortunately, however, the discussion about SOPA is incomplete.


SOPA: an introduction, update and review

Over the past month, battle lines have been drawn over a proposed new law in the US called the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).

If passed, it will strengthen the American Justice Department’s power to go after websites that host disputed copyright material and could make sites such as YouTube, Tumblr, and Reddit liable for violations.