Posts tagged with Page Speed

Need for speed: how to optimise website performance

Website performance radically impacts our success, 64% of smartphone users expect websites to load in under four seconds.

However, average page weights are still on the rise. 

As marketers, website performance can seem utterly beyond our control. Here’s how to change that...

9 comments

Schuh's adoption of responsive and the importance of a 'mobile first' approach

Footwear retailer Schuh has just launched a new responsive site, but previously used its outlet site, Branch309, as a pilot for this. 

The development of this site, and the lessons learned, have been applied to the main site, and highlight the advantages of 'mobile-first' thinking. 

In other words, designing for the simplicity of the mobile experience has benefits for desktop users too. 

Using extracts from our Mobile Web Design and Development Best Practice Guide, I'll describe Shuh's journey towards responsive design. 

6 comments

How to assess if your site is at risk of a Google penalty

Many large brands are thought to have fallen victim to a Google penalty for infringing the search giant’s guidelines against web spam.

How can you tell if your site might be at risk? 

2 comments

Slow page speed: what to measure, how to measure, and how it’s affecting your ecommerce channel

A recent article on the Econsultancy blog discussed the issue of page load times getting slower with some helpful tips on what can be done to help speed things up.  

The article stimulates other questions that I thought it would be interesting to tackle in more depth. 

17 comments

Ecommerce page load times are becoming slower: stats

Site speed is one of the most important elements in providing a good online user experience as nobody wants to sit around waiting for pages to load.

In fact research has shown that a one second delay in load time can cause 7% loss in customer conversions.

But a new report from Radware suggests that despite the effort that businesses put into ensuring a fast load time, average site speeds are actually getting slower.

The study shows that in spring 2012 the median page took 6.79 seconds to load, but this has now dropped to 7.72 seconds, a slowdown of 13.7%.

4 comments

Which newspaper has the slowest website?

While it's understandable that news sites want to maximise online revenues as offline ad sales decline, but they run the risk of damaging the user experience

Several popular newspaper sites are now cumbersome and slow to load, thanks to the sheer number of elements on the page. 

Having looked at the page speed of the top e-commerce sites in the UK, I thought I'd do the same with news sites. So which is the slowest? 

2 comments

Ad overkill: are news sites putting ad revenues before usability?

Many newspapers are struggling to survive, and you can understand that they would want to maximise online ad revenues, but I think some run the risk of losing users through ad overkill. 

Some news websites, and this in common on regional sites especially, are using some very annoying and intrusive ad formats which could be doing more harm than good. 

I'm not saying they shouldn't use advertising, but newspapers have to find a balance between reader engagement and maximising ad revenues.

4 comments

Google aims to speed up the web with mod_pagespeed

Google Page Speed can be a helpful tool for publishers and developers looking to speed their websites up. The Firefox add-on can identify bottlenecks that are keeping pages from loading as quickly as they should.

Unfortunately, some of the recommendations Page Speed makes aren't always easy to implement. So Google is trying to change that as part of its Make the Web Faster initiative.

5 comments

Speed up your site with Google Page Speed

With broadband internet connections so prevalent around the world, it's easy for web designers and developers to get a little bit lazy when it comes to optimizing the pages they create or that their applications generate.

After all, a broadband connection is usually pretty forgiving and can even render certain best practices and good habits entirely unnecessary.

2 comments