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Posts tagged with Responsive

BBC News launches new responsive website: review

The BBC has finally switched off its old desktop site and is now redirecting mobile users away from its .m site to its brand new fully responsive news site.

BBC News’s previous iteration was four years old, and although it regularly broke records for attracting worldwide traffic (64m unique visitors in January 2013) the site has been need of a multi-screen compatible upgrade for some time. In fact since inviting users to trial a beta version of the new site in December, BBC News has seen 65% of its users now accessing the site from tablets and mobiles.


How does FatFace's responsive site shape up?

FatFace has revealed that its Christmas 2014 ecommerce sales were 25% up on 2013, whilst December sales were 13% up.

tfl logo

Transport for London launches sumptuous new website

What’s that plinky plonky banjo sound? Yep it’s a new website explainer video!

TfL’s new website, which we looked at in beta back in July 2013, is now live and it’ll surely have been seen already by many of the London readers amongst you.

The TfL site has been used by two million visitors whilst in beta. That’s no mean achievement and indicative of just what a challenge the TFL website undergoes on a daily basis.

In April 2013, the TFL website had 20m visitors every month. That’s every Londoner visiting more than twice. 

The new site includes some really good features that vastly improve TfL’s ability to present information to the traveller. 

Let’s have a look at the new site.

One Way Sign

Responsive web design: five reasons why it may not be the right answer

I generally find myself in agreement with the authors on Econsultancy, but when I read Ben Davis’ article: 10 websites that aren’t responsive (and probably should be).

I didn't agree with this, as I think those websites aren’t responsive because they don’t need to be.

Responsive design is a wonderful tool and is a great solution for quite a lot of sites. I have used responsive design to deliver many sites, but it’s not a magic bullet that will solve all pains around mobile. 

neck and neck

Mobile and desktop traffic: neck and neck?

Mobile is now more important than desktop (I posit). You only have to look at Google’s recent changes to see that change is irrevocably afoot. 

Tom Loosemore, Deputy Director at GDS, pondered yesterday whether a significant landmark, mobile devices bringing more traffic than laptops and PCs, is near.

There’s some great stuff in his blog and I thought I’d have a look around to find some additional evidence and perhaps even make the bold claim that mobile traffic is already in the majority!

See what you think and I’d love you to add some stats from your own site to the comments below, allowing us to make a more reasoned evaluation still.


Oka's new responsive site highlights the difficulty of creating great UX

Luxury furniture retailer Oka has become the latest ecommerce business to launch a responsive site.

For the uninitiated, responsive design is widely accepted as the future of web design as it involves deploying a site only once and using style sheets to reformat the content based primarily on screen width to fit the device.

This means that the same site is optimised for all different screen sizes, getting rid of the need to create a separate mobile site.

mobile home cloggs

Cloggs responsive redesign: mega gallery

With 2013 the first year tablet shipments are expected to exceed that of PCs and also a year in which smartphone penetration reaches 64% in the US (Nielsen), responsive design is rightly this year’s hot topic.

Despite this, it seems a lot of big brands are playing catch up, with new research from Venda showing just one of the UK’s top 50 most visited retail sites (Curry’s) currently hosts a responsive website.

A quarter of websites analysed don’t have a mobile optimised site, and many retailers host their mobile site under a different URL structure to their existing website, which could be negatively impacting their SEO and affecting their efforts with analytics. 

As comScore estimates a third of all UK page views now come from smartphones and tablets, delivering a slick customer experience across all devices has become a massive competitive advantage for retailers.

To that end, I've been looking at the new responsive Cloggs website. 

responsive design IAB

Just 11% of top spending advertisers use responsive design

Responsive design is widely accepted to be the most effective way of accommodating the consumer shift towards mobile technologies, yet a new report from the IAB suggests that companies have been relatively slow on the up take.

Just 11% of the UK’s 100 highest spending advertisers currently use responsive design, including Nissan, Direct Line, Go Compare, Microsoft and Chanel.

Some sectors have been quicker on the uptake than others, but due to the small sample size it’s difficult to really drill down into the percentages.

And though the number of brands that have gone responsive remains quite low, the report also found that in August 2013 58% of the top 100 advertisers in 2012 had mobile optimised websites.


13 inspirational examples of travel sites using responsive design

After being alerted to the fact that Virgin had just launched a new responsive website I was looking forward to testing out the UX of its flight booking process (because I’m a bit of a square).

So I was disappointed to discover that only the corporate site has gone responsive, while its travel brands have retained their old sites.

This inspired me to hunt around for other examples of responsive travel sites, the results of which can be seen below.

It’s worth noting that none of the main travel brands appear to have moved to responsive design, so its been left up to local tourist boards and boutique hotels to lead the charge.

Also, not all of these examples are well executed but they do at least highlight pitfalls that others should try to avoid.

For more information on this topic, read our other blog posts on ecommerce sites that have used responsive design and brands that increased conversion rates by going responsive.


10 great examples of responsive design from around the world

Responsive design as a standard feature on a website is growing quickly.

There is no longer much of a debate over whether brands need a mobile site, as consumer demand dictates that sites need to be optimised for small screens.

The choice now is between a dedicated mobile site, an app, or responsive design. 

So to show how responsive design can be applied in practice, here are 10 examples from around the world...

Nixon responsive ecommerce screenshot

A responsive ecommerce masterclass from Nixon: part one

We are being asked more and more by our clients to provide support as they move towards responsive design. In particular our retail clients are aiming to deliver ‘best in class’ responsive ecommerce experiences for their visitors.

Couple this with them being committed to an optimisation strategy, and we are extremely excited about the potential to improve their online performance.

But the challenge is, with so few larger retailers with large product catalogues already having moved to a responsive design (and this doesn’t mean the ones that have are necessarily doing it well) where can inspiration be gained to deliver a best in class experience?

Enter stage left Nixon, which starts its about page text with ‘We make the little shit better’.


Nine questions every CMO should ask their mobile strategist

With a recent study showing that only a tiny 14% of CMOs are happy with their mobile strategy we thought it was about time people start asking questions about their brand in mobile. 

Mike Philips (Strategist) and I put together nine questions that every CMO should ask their mobile strategist.