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Posts tagged with Oxfam

book shelves

How online book shops can harness the power of social proof

For the true bibliophile, the book shop is one of the few retail experiences impossible to replicate online.

Yes, there are hundreds of extremely competitive ecommerce sites that offer cheaper-than-high-street books with free delivery, but what they're missing is the sensory experience of browsing a book shop's shelves; the touch, the smell and most importantly, the conversation.

I spent seven years working as a bookseller, and as my learned colleague Ben Davis will agree: once a bookseller, always a bookseller. It's impossible not to shoehorn one's innate love of books into most conversations. 

Part of the joy of working with books is the interaction with the customers. It was extraordinarily easy to load up a customer with armfuls of recommendations when all they came into purchase was the latest Maeve Binchy. 

This is where online book stores can match the offline experience: Conversation, interaction and engagement, all through the art of social proof.

I've previously gone into greater detail about social proof here: Whitbread and the power of social proof; this post mainly concentrated on the food, drink and leisure services as well as describing how social proofing works. 

Here I'm going to use the examples discussed in that post and the examples in our 11 great ways to use social proof in ecommerce article to see how online book shops compare.

5 comments

10 charities and how they use Pinterest

Much of the work we do on the Econsultancy blog focuses on major consumer brands and how they use various marketing channels, but we occasionally get asked why we rarely mention charities.

It’s a topic we looked at a few years ago in a post that flagged up which charities use Twitter, so I thought it would be interesting to take a similar look at charities that use Pinterest.

To be clear, these aren’t necessarily the ones that I think are doing the best job of using Pinterest, it’s really just a look at how recognisable charities with different aims and causes are making use of the social network...

18 comments