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Posts tagged with Ftc

illegal drugs

Is ad fraud the 21st century drug trade?

Ad fraud is not a new topic, but as some U.S. Senators who are members of the powerful Senate Banking Committee see it, action is needed to prevent ad fraud from ballooning into one of organized crime's most lucrative businesses.

In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) urging the agency to look into ad fraud, the Senators suggested "It remains to be seen whether voluntary, market-based oversight is sufficient to protect consumers and advertisers from digital advertising fraud."

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What advertisers need to know about the FTC's new guidance on native ads

With ad blockers here to stay, publishers and advertisers have rushed to develop new ways of reaching consumers online.

One of the fastest-growing alternatives to traditional digital advertising is native advertising.

Some publishers now earn significant percentages of their revenue from native ads, and there's no evidence that interest in and adoption of native ads will wane any time soon.

If anything, growth in the use of native ads will only accelerate in 2016.

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FTC warns about native ads

In an effort to reach consumers amidst multiple assaults on their ads, many marketers have embraced native advertising.

But the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has concerns, and markets and publishers could soon find themselves at risk if they aren't careful.

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FTC: Google search bias is a part of innovation

Has Google altered its algorithm to favor its own properties in vertical search results?

Numerous publishers which now find themselves competing with the search engine they rely on for valuable traffic have accused Google of doing just that. Some in the industry have even petitioned antitrust regulators to look into the matter.

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Is the Instagram backlash a backlash against native advertising?

Instagram is changing. The popular mobile photo sharing service's rapid rise and $1bn acquisition by Facebook is the stuff of startup legends, but Instagram's story is still being written.

Today, the new path the company is charting has it fighting strong headwinds as users take issue with some of its plans.

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Microsoft warns consumers: don't get Scroogled

Many of the millions of consumers shopping this holiday season will turn to the world's most popular search engine, Google, in search of the perfect gift at the perfect price.

But Microsoft has a message for those consumers: be careful, you might get Scroogled.

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US likely to pursue antitrust case against Google: report

In 1998, the United States Department of Justice and 20 states filed a lawsuit against Microsoft alleging that the software giant abused a monopoly position in the market to dominate the market for web browsers.

The stakes were high. If it lost, Microsoft could have been forced to break itself into two parts. And even though it eventually settled under more favorable terms, the case against Microsoft is arguably the defining moment in the company's history.

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15% of social media reviews will be fake by 2014: report

The Beatles once sang, "All you need is love" and thanks to the rise of social media, it's not just humans looking for it. Brands, once largely relegated to communicating with consumers through one-way mediums like television and radio, have flocked to services like Facebook and Twitter in search of long-term relationships.

If the millions of 'Likes' and followers some of them have attracted are any indication, social media could be the foundation of a happy marriage between brands and consumers. But under the surface, this relationship may not be as solid as it appears.

According to Gartner, brands are increasingly turning to paying for positive reviews, 'Likes' and followers on popular social networking sites and by 2014, the research firm estimates that over one in ten of these will be fake.

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FTC clears Facebook's Instagram acquisition

It may not be the $1bn deal it was when it was announced in April, but Facebook's acquisition of popular mobile photo sharing service Instagram is a done deal.

Last week, the UK's Office Of Fair Trading gave the nod to the purchase and yesterday, the last regulator standing, the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC), cleared the deal too.

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FTC seeks to expand restrictions on data collection from children

For more than a decade, companies in the United States operating websites that collect data from children have been required to comply with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).

At the time COPPA was implemented, the internet ecosystem was far less mature, and the law didn't cover all of the parties that today frequently collect data from children. So yesterday, the FTC published a proposal (PDF) with the intent of modifying COPPA to ensure that parties not currently governed by COPPA's rules are covered.

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Do Not Track gains support, but will it really work?

Today, the administration of US President Barack Obama announced a blueprint for a "Privacy Bill of Rights."

The goal: "improve consumers’ privacy protections" and "give users more control over how their personal information is used on the Internet", all the while maintaining the internet's status as an "engine for innovation and economic growth."

To achieve that goal, the president has enlisted the help of some of the internet's biggest names, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL.

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Can Google walk a mile in Microsoft's shoes?

Google and Microsoft are long-standing rivals. Microsoft, of course, has played the role of the old, stodgy tech stalwart, while Google has played the role of the innovative, quirky upstart.

But Google and Microsoft may soon have a lot more common. That's because the Federal Trade Commission, spurred on in part by complaints from Google's own advertisers, is reportedly opening a wide antitrust probe that will determine if the search giant is abusing its search dominance in an illegal manner.

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