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Posts tagged with Qr Code

10 trends that will impact your mobile commerce strategy

Finally, mobile devices are at a stage where technology meets and occasionally exceeds the expectations of the consumer.

Although not every retailer is offering a flawless and perfectly persuasive conversion bonanza when it comes to a mobile commerce experience, but most are now beginning to at least think ‘mobile first’ when it comes to ecommerce design.  

Obviously the arguments for responsive or adaptive design can hardly be considered a trend as it’s a conversation that's been raging for a long while.

So let's tale a look at some other recent trends that may impact an ecommerce team’s mobile strategy.


10 retail and ecommerce stores integrating offline with online

From the experiential (read as ‘gimmicky’) to the practical (read as ‘will become standard practice’) there are many ways that retailers can integrate their offline stores on the high street with their online ecommerce businesses.

There’s lots of information on the blog already about digital technology in retail and a lot of it really should be thought of as the norm by now.

Unfortunately that’s not necessarily true. In a perfectly digitally integrated world the lack of services like Wi-Fi, contactless payment and click & collect would be the exception to the rule.

However there are still many trailblazers out there, not just offering the digital basics, but going above and beyond the duty of its bricks and mortar stores and offering a new world of interactivity and online integration.

Sure some of them will fail. Sure some of them you’ll barely hear about outside of a few speculative/curious articles like this (“huh, remember a few years ago when Google developed a self-driving car? What happened to that?”) 

Some won’t though. Some will go on to become exactly what’s expected from every consumer who visits your high street store.


Eight great examples of mobile marketing from Southeast Asia

Mobile penetration varies hugely among APAC nations, however in developed countries such as Hong Kong and Singapore more than three-quarters of the population own a smartphone.

In response to this consumer trend APAC marketers have to place greater emphasis on mobile, which has resulted in some extremely creative campaigns.

Having previously investigated stats on m-commerce from the region, here are eight excellent examples of mobile marketing campaigns from APAC.


Three ways for marketers to grow, maintain and drive business with mobile CRM

Consumers use their mobile devices to comparison shop, get directions to a business, or make reservations at their favorite restaurant. But often the communication from brands stops there. 

Businesses of all kinds should be better engaging via mobile with their customers. After all, engaged customers are your most valuable asset: optimising engagement can help you outperform the competition.

QR code campaigns

Five examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked

QR codes often get slated for being ugly and unpopular with consumers, but they still frequently crop up on ads and billboards so marketers must still see some potential in these little pixelated squares.

Often the problem with QR codes is that they are badly implemented, while it’s all too easy to find examples of codes that are impossible to scan.

However, when marketers take care over the user experience, the technology can be put to good use, with Toyota being a notable example.

Having previously highlighted six examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked I thought it would be worth trawling the internet to see if any new case studies had cropped up.


Could Argos do more to integrate digital into its print catalogue?

While strolling around Farringdon the other day I was handed a copy of the new Argos catalogue by a cheery store employee.

Having already reviewed several of Argos’ digital products, including its mobile app, I thought it would be interesting to see how the company integrates digital elements into its catalogue.

Print has long been the backbone of Argos’ business and no doubt still is, yet as times change digital will become a more important revenue stream.

So, here’s a quick look at how Argos is adapting to the changing times...


How Evans Cycles uses QR codes in-store to deliver product details and reviews

The high street’s struggles with ecommerce and the digital age have been well publicised in the past 12 months as a number of previously dominant brands have gone to the wall. 

And in general the brands that have thrived are those that were quick to adapt and integrate digital technologies in-store, such as John Lewis and House of Fraser.

In our report How The Internet Can Save The High Street we detailed some of the new tactics and strategies that retailers should be trying to take advantage of, such as click-and-collect, mobile search, apps and QR codes.

QR codes are a much-maligned technology - particularly by us – however they can be used in-store to allow customers to access additional product information and reviews.


11% of Europeans have scanned a QR-enabled outdoor ad

Just 11% of European consumers have scanned a QR code in an outdoor advert, according to a new a survey by CBS Outdoor.

This is despite the fact that the study showed that more than half (54%) of respondents are aware of what QR codes are for. 

It does need to be taken into account that outdoor advertising refers exclusively to billboards and posters, with press ads not included in the survey.

The Interactive Europe 2013 report also found that 75% of urban audiences now own a smartphone, up from 56% last year, so the opportunity for targeting them with mobile and interactive ads is huge.

Overall though, the report found that awareness of interactive advertising technology remains quite low.


How effective is M&S's use of QR codes?

In digital marketing terms QR codes seem to have been around for ages, yet it’s still much easier to find examples of brands using the technology badly than it is to highlight instances that deliver a decent user experience. 

A few months ago I flagged up a Toyota print ad as a good example of how to use QR codes to deliver a fun and engaging mobile experience and I’ve since been on the look out for similar campaigns.

As with all new technologies it is quite easy to dismiss QR codes as a passing fad, particularly as user uptake has been quite slow.

However a survey published today by Nielsen shows that 18% of UK consumers regularly use a QR or barcode scanner, so there may be life in the old dog yet.

Marks & Spencer certainly seems to think so, as it has placed a large QR code in the centre of its Mother’s Day window display in Brixton (you can scan the same code above), and potentially in its other stores around the country.

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A quarter of shoppers admit to 'showrooming' over Christmas

Almost a quarter (24%) of UK shoppers used their mobile while in-store to compare prices in the run-up to Christmas, according to a new survey from Foolproof.

The process, known as ‘showrooming’, means that retailers have to come up with new ways to encourage customers to make a purchase in-store.

Alarmingly for some retailers, the survey of 1,000 adults also found that 40% of showroomers, or one in 10 of all shoppers, bought items from a competitor after comparing prices on their phone.

Unsurprisingly the habit is more prevalent among younger shoppers, with 39% of 18-39 year olds actively engaging in showrooming over Christmas compared to just 18% of shoppers over the age of 40.


QR code best practice from Toyota

Last week I looked at the way advertisers were using QR codes in Sport magazine, and the results were far from impressive.

It seems it’s still commonplace for marketers to link mobile users to desktop sites and few of the adverts included a call-to-action or instructions on how to scan the QR code.

However among the badly executed campaigns, Toyota stood out as a brand that had clearly thought through the entire user journey and considered they type of content that mobile users would find engaging and useful.

We've previously blogged eight best practice tips for using QR codes in marketing, so I thought I'd see how Toyota puts these into practice...


Linking Mobile uses CPA model to sell ads based on QR code activation

Linking Mobile is attempting to use transactional QR codes to take the affiliate model to offline marketing channels.

The codes have been printed onto 100,000 leaflets advertising the Accident Advice Helpline (AAH), which have been distributed across London by promotions company Double Bubble.

Rather than paying up front for cost of printing the hand-outs, AAH will be charged using a cost per acquisition (CPA) model, and Double Bubble with also be paid per registration.

In this case, the 'acquisition' is based on how many customers fill out a form after being directed to a mobile site via the QR code.