Posts tagged with Television

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Channel 4 on the future of TV, personalisation & GDPR

Sarah Rose is Director of Consumer Insights at Channel 4. I caught up with her to discuss all things personalisation.

It's an incredibly exciting time to be working in TV, and Rose gave me some insight into emerging trends amongst audiences, as well as the work the company is doing to curate its content for users.

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Why did Amazon's online video shopping channel fail?

Last March, Amazon launched Style Code Live, a daily live online show that looked like an attempt to bring the home shopping channel into the 21st century.

But little more than a year later, Amazon apparently decided that Style Code Live was not going to be this generation's answer to TV shopping.

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Driven by mobile, digital overtakes TV in US ad spend for the first time

The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) this week released its numbers for ad spend in the US in 2016, and for the first time since the organization began tracking digital ad spend in 2004, spend on digital ads has surprassed spend on television ads.

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Hollywood's response to digital disruption looks like a flop

Digital disruption has been felt in Hollywood, and even if it's not all doom and gloom as some old media skeptics suggest, there's no doubt that Hollywood firms have been forced to rethink how they create and sell their content.

But some of the latest moves Hollywood players are reportedly considering as they address the changing media landscape beg the question: is Hollywood totally missing the plot?

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Is there a Facebook ad bubble?

Despite the fact that it's a mature tech giant and not a scrappy little startup, Facebook revenues continue to grow at a blistering clip.

This not only suggests that Facebook has not only come a long way in figuring out its ad model but that advertisers are liking the results they're seeing.

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The Mindy Project Tinder Profiles

Covert native ad campaigns can catfish consumers

A New York City doctor with a Witherspoon personality, Nicki Minaj body, Sinatra eyes and love of fried donuts might be your perfect match.

She’s 34, single and looking to meet other local singles in the city. She may seem too good to be true, and that’s because she is.

This New York City bachelorette’s main motivation is to prompt you to tune in for the season premiere of her primetime TV show, The Mindy Project, on Fox Primetime.

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1950s family television

16% of TV's audience is using social media at the same time: stats

One in every six occasions, viewers who watch primetime television are also using social media, whether its related to the show they’re watching or not.

This is according to the latest study from the Council for Research Excellence (CRE) based on a sample of 1,665 respondents between September and October 2013.

In an earlier study carried out by Deloitte in 2013, more than half of adults admitted to interacting with another form of media while they watch television, this is more than double the previous year’s figure of 24% who admit to second screening.

This is a huge increase and this figure will likely rise even more steeply in 2014. The Deloitte research however covers all activity on a mobile device, whether it’s interacting on social media, shopping, browsing the internet for unrelated information or sending emails. 

Let’s take a look at some more results from the CRE study, which mainly concentrates on the use of social media while second-screening.

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homer on a tv

My fundamental doubts about the second screen

Forgive the first person pronoun in the headline, but television is the most emotive of subjects.

Not for nothing does the Simpsons use the TV set as a cultural trope. Perhaps the emergence of broadband and the creative decline of the Simpsons is more than correlative?

Anyway, I don’t dispute the second screen phenomenon, not one bit. I use my phone whilst watching TV all the time.

What I am disputing, outside of a few important examples, is the extent of consumer demand for contextual second screen experiences. Within this disputation comes the assertion that a lot of second screen use is indeed not contextual (aside from social media use) and cannot therefore be ‘monetised’ as such.

Of course, fans of the second screen may point out that the reason second screen usage isn’t yet contextual is because second screen services and apps are nowhere near maturation yet. There may be improved uses and better content to come.

I’d argue that the same problems that beset social advertising (a place for branding but not sales) will ultimately beset the second screen, driven as it is by the demand for socialising whilst watching the box.

See if you agree with my devil’s advocate’s views.

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Facebook logo

Facebook and TV: can it compete with Twitter for live engagement?

One need only look at the trending topics on any given evening to know that Twitter is a popular tool for discussing television shows.

The network has become the go-to forum for reaction to TV programmes and is one of the few things that ensures people still watch live TV rather than relying on on-demand services.

However a new report suggests that Facebook may also be a popular talking shop for TV shows.

This is a topic we’ve previously discussed in articles looking at why Facebook can’t beat Twitter for social TV and a best practice post on driving live engagement.

But the new report suggests we may have been wrong to dismiss Facebook’s potential for TV chatter, with up to a quarter of the television audience posting content related to the show they are watching on Facebook.

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1950 camera

The future of TV: five innovations to look out for

The box, the tube, the telly, the television. Are any of us sure the set is set to evolve?

The television is one of those unifying pleasures and most people are already happy with the experience of watching it.

Additionally, advertisers still think of television as the big hitting ad medium, rightly or wrongly. 

So, if it’s not broken, why fix it? Or is that the kind of reasoning that stymies innovation?

I think it’s fairly obvious that although we can choose to think of television as a constant, it has changed significantly since it went digital. FreeView in the UK, TiVo, Sky+, on-demand services like iPlayer and Netflix, Apple TV and Chromecast, the impact of Twitter and social TV, Roku, there have been many developments.

But what’s next? Here I’ve tried to sum up some of the innovations for advertisers and viewers I’ve seen in the last few months. See what you think..

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H&M's big gamble with t-commerce at the Super Bowl

H&M is set to launch its entry into the nascent world of ‘television commerce’ during this Sunday’s Super Bowl.

The interactive, 30 second-long ad starring David Beckham will be screened during the second quarter of Super Bowl XLVIII and will allow viewers the chance to purchase the featured products via a Samsung Smart TV. It’s the first of its kind.

It’s an intriguing gambit and one that all marketers, advertisers and anyone with a keen interest in David Beckham running around in his underwear will be paying particular attention to.

If anything it’s certainly raising H&M’s profile ahead of the big game, where the biggest brands in the world fight for the attention of 108m viewers (2013 viewing figures) and can pay up to $4m for the privilege. In fact sneak previews of Super Bowl ads began to appear a couple weeks ago, such is the feverish building-up of anticipation.

H&M's experiment with t-commerce raises a few questions: Is H&M really the first to do this? What are the restrictions of t-commerce? Will t-commerce have a future?

Let's see if we can answer those questions here.

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What will TV look like in 2031?

The year is 2031. Flying cars have just hit the open market, the New York Mets are on the verge of winning their first World Series in forty-five years, and television as we know it has ceased to exist.  

Let’s first imagine that a super smart group of MIT engineers solved all the technical troubles we’d encounter in switching from a broadcast to a unicast model.

The public’s consumption habits now overwhelmingly favor an on-demand format, and each household is equipped with a SmarTV capable of streaming content instantaneously from anywhere on the web.

Traditional channels have fallen in the face of more agile competition from platforms like Netflix and Hulu, or they’ve adapted to HBO Go-esque versions of their former selves.

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