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Author: Richard Hartigan

Richard Hartigan

Search calls to action: pros and cons

The use of search calls to action is becoming increasingly common in offline advertising. Big brands are using mediums such as press and TV in order to push people to search engines by asking them to search for specific keywords rather than visit a website or phone a dedicated number.

Like most marketing techniques there is an argument for and against adopting this approach, and Renault's latest 'Megane Experiment' campaign shows how brands can get it wrong. 


The challenge of identifying target keywords

It is widely accepted that SEO has evolved from simplistic initiatives such as keyword density and frequency within a page of content. Search algorithms are continually evolving to understand context and attitudes based on advanced semantic analysis.

That said, understanding the target keywords of a given web page will always remain a key focus for SEO development. The main principal remains; each page should have a clear and unique theme.


The power of non-purchase

Attribution modelling techniques are usually carried out with an aim to distribute the value of a sale to the contributing online media in order to optimise the online marketing mix towards an appropriate target.

But the value of click path analysis is far greater than attributing value to the small proportion of customers that actually purchase online. For most organisations transacting online, the majority of interactions with online marketing campaigns result in non-purchase.

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Understanding the true cost of search

As an organisation goes through various stages of online maturity, responsibility for the e-commerce function can fluctuate between marketing, sales and IT. However it is clear that certain elements of the online marketing mix are greater than any individual department and impact upon the organisation as a whole.


Attribution modelling: the value of a view

My previous post focused on the changing attribution model that online marketers are currently grappling with and the impact on the affiliate channel in particular. This provoked some interesting debate amongst affiliate marketers and analytics software providers on the subject of attribution modelling.

I wanted to expand upon this model by debating the perceived importance of impression statistics and how these should potentially be weighted within an attribution model.


The changing model of online marketing attribution

For a number of years I have actively challenged the last click wins model when it comes to attributing value to an online marketing campaign.

I have experimented with various methodologies and eventually settled on the one I believe to be the most beneficial to the particular brand or campaign I am
working on.