Posts tagged with Network Effects

Facebook's biggest challenge: retaining teens?

The world's biggest social network, Facebook, has an enviable position: it is ubiquitous with teenagers, a demographic group that is often elusive and fickle, but that at the same time is generally seen by marketers as one of the most important demographic groups out there.

In many cases, that is one of the reasons that marketers continue to pour more and more money into their Facebook marketing efforts despite the fact that many of them can't precisely quantify what they're getting in return.

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Five ways to fight commoditization of your business

What's a company's worst nightmare? There are probably a few of them, but one of the worst is commoditization.

Finding your market filled with competition that looks almost identical to your business is a frustrating, disheartening experience, but it's a common one.

Thanks to the ease with which web-based applications and business models can be 'duplicated', most new internet companies will find themselves protected by narrow moats at best.

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Has Chatroulette finally jumped the shark?

Chatroulette, the social website that connects users randomly for short online video chats, has become one of 2010's more interesting 'startup' stories. Founded by a 17 year-old high school student in Russia, Chatroulette has attracted so much attention that some are convinced it could become a valuable business.

Yet according to comScore, Chatroulette's traffic dropped for the first time ever in May, leading some to wonder whether Chatroulette is on the verge of proving itself to be little more than the latest crazy internet fad.

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Can a social network get too big?

Facebook has over 175m users. MySpace has over 125m. Twitter's traffic has grown at over 1,000%.

All three services are considered to be extremely valuable and their popularity is where the value is at. With their users, they're worth hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars. Without them, they're worth close to nothing.

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