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Posts tagged with Flash

Everything brands need to know about Gifs

The internet economy has been partying like it's 1999, so it's fitting that something that was popular in 1999, the animated Gif, has found a role on the modern web.

Here's what brands need to know about the image file format that has found new life.


Former brand marketer: banner ads suck, but they're great

Fraud. Viewability. The demise of Flash.

The lowly banner ad is under attack and just about everybody agrees: banner ads are the past but not the future of advertising. But is everybody wrong?


It's time for Flash to die, but advertisers aren't quite ready

"It is time for Adobe to announce the end-of-life date for Flash and to ask the browsers to set killbits on the same day."

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20 things that could be slowing your website down

Your website could be a visually-stunning conversion machine, but its appearance and functionality won't matter much if it takes too long to load. That's because web users are increasingly impatient and their impatience is likely to continue to grow as tablet and mobile web usage skyrockets.

Unfortunately, the list of things that can cause users to flee a website is long, and in many instances, any one of them can be enough to turn a new customer into a lost opportunity.


For gaming companies, HTML5 is not ready

Of the few markets in which Flash is still relevant, gaming is perhaps the largest. Despite the fact that Adobe seems intent on killing Flash, for many game developers, Flash is still a necessity.

The big question, of course, is for how long? There's a lot of excitement about HTML5, and some game developers have actually been experimenting with HTML5 game development.


Is Adobe trying to kill Flash with premium features?

For many, Flash is the bane of the web and its death will be a cause for celebration.

A more balanced perspective is that Flash was at one point incredibly useful, but like many useful things, it was overused and abused and will increasingly have less and less utility as newer and better web technologies let us achieve things we once had to turn to Flash for.


Adobe aims to make mobile web development easier with Shadow

While the native versus mobile web apps debate continues to rage, one thing is for sure: mobile browsers are going to get a lot more capable, and that means there will be more development of mobile web apps.

Developers of mobile web apps will face numerous challenges, from performance to monetization. But one challenge stands out perhaps more than the rest: building an app that functions and looks good across multiple devices.

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Adobe to focus Flash on games and "premium" video

Flash might not be dead, but Adobe is acting like it knows it's past its prime.

Case in point: the company ditched Flash for mobile late last year, and is increasingly hedging its bets with investments in standards-based web technologies like HTML5.


Adobe is jumping the gun on HTML5

Last week, Adobe announced that it is abandoning Flash for mobiles and Flash for televisions.

It was a significant announcement that raised a lot of eyebrows, and led some to question whether the end of Flash is near. One of Apple's biggest fanboys even went so far as to declare the company's retreat from mobile Steve Jobs' last triumph.

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Adobe to ditch Flash for mobile

Adobe is expected to cease development of Flash Player for browsers on mobiles devices.

A blog post from the company outlined plans to focus on enabling Flash developers to package native apps with Adobe AIR for all major app stores.


Adobe doubles down on its HTML5 mobile bet

For Adobe, the rise of mobile, and the iPhone and iPad in particular, has been bittersweet.

Yes, the company most recognizable to consumers for its Reader and Flash products, has plenty of new opportunities thanks to mobile, but exploiting them has required the company to look at a number of Plan Bs.

The primary reason: Apple doesn't like Flash. Adobe tried to persuade Apple that Flash isn't so bad, but that wasn't going anywhere, so the company has been increasingly betting its mobile future on other technologies, like HTML5.

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Stop being Flash and embrace open web standards

The noughties have been a good to the world of the web. Open standards and a philosophy of interoperability have led to widespread adoption of several languages which offer power without proprietary limits.

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